Craftsman or Engineer?

A brief word on a practical software engineering issue:

A lot has been written on the differences between Craftsman and Engineer.  Recently I came across a simple example by Hofstadter & Sander, that nicely shows the basic difference in thinking. We start with a little exercise:

“Draw a square, a rectangle, a rhombus, and a parallelogram.”

Some people draw a solution as in (a), some draw solution (b).  Both are perfectly acceptable in their way:
shapes abstraction

  • With (a) you show your detail knowledge, of how the shapes are defined, s.t. you are able to give a typical example for each class.
  • With (b) you show your ability to abstract, of how the shapes are related to each other, s.t. you are able to give a special case valid for all conditions.

shapes concept lattice and context

The latter is an abstraction by constructing formal concepts, i.e. by deriving the concept (lattice) from the (context). Imho, being able to ‘navigate’ the concept lattice – that of course looks much more complex for real world subject areas – is what separates the thinking of Engineer and Craftsman.

So long
|=

PS
For example, from my personal experience in business analysis I may say, that typically there are lots of people on the expert side with type (a) knowledge, so what they need an analyst (on engineer-level) for, is help them to create type (b) understanding from it.

About modelpractice

Modeling Theory and Abstraction Awareness in the gap btw rigour of science and relevance to engineering.
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2 Responses to Craftsman or Engineer?

  1. Ed Seidewitz says:

    Yeah, I hadn’t thought if it quite this way, but it fits! Engineering uses a foundational understanding of the relationships between concepts in order to allow a practitioner to provide a better solution.

  2. Pingback: Craftsman or Engineer? | Ragnarok Connection

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